Does the weather make pain worse?

People say it all the time: “Oh, it’s gonna rain, I can tell in my knee” or “My knees really hurt over the weekend… they do that with bad weather.” What is it with these magical knees? From my personal vantage point, there is no logic to this… it’s simply psychological mis-attribution of causes… but it is heard so often, is there something to it?

Well, I asked on Twitter and fully enjoyed the convos that occurred…

Matt Dancigers Twitter convo weather

So here is a summary of what was shared: Continue reading

Lost in Translation

In reading Spencer’s recent posts (particularly Part 2, but also Part 1) I am struck by an interesting theme.  The information was there. It was just somehow interpreted wrong and dispersed wrong, or received wrong… like a game of telephone.

Spencer mentions that the IASP definition of pain “an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage, or described in terms of such damage” is clearly presented in education. Since it is there all along… how does it get lost in translation? Can we blame the Continue reading

It’s Your World

Nociception is subject to all the truths and flaws of any other input system.

Patients never have this view, since their pain has been described to them in terms of body parts and structures.  However, the tissue is as important in pain as the eyeball is in what we see.

This past week’s viral internet subject is a great example of all that (Black ‘n’ Blue dress).  Vision is simply our brain’s decision based on the information available to it, including, but not limited to, the light waves of objects.  The eye itself is simply an Continue reading

Poor Posture Equals Pain, Right?

Img Cred: India.com

If you’ve been anywhere near a peer reviewed Journal in the past years you are well aware that the idea of positions equaling pain has been fully debunked (Eyal Lederman, Greg Lehman, Todd HargroveSportsDietPain ) The concept of poor posture = pain is still widely used (I won’t even list here…) but it is not backed-up by pain science.

Or is it?

Poor posture can indeed increase the chances of pain. Now, posture is a state.  An act.  A positioning of one’s self. Psychology tells us that if we stand tall with a smile then we will feel more powerful and be a more agreeable person.

“Kahneman writes about test subjects given a pencil. In one set of tests the subjects are asked to hold the pencil between their teeth horizontally. In another the same subjects are asked to purse their lips around the eraser end of the pencil. Then the subjects were shown cartoons from Gary Larson’s The Far Side. Those in the first group, with the horizontal pencil, were more likely to find the images funny than the second group, with their lips pursed around the pencil’s eraser end. What’s going on? The researchers concluded that clenching the pencil horizontally yielded a “smile,” with cheeks pinched back and the outer edges of the mouth turned upwards. Those holding the pencil’s eraser end in their mouths yielded a “frown.”” The Observer

So our body position affects our perception of reality.  And pain is perception of stimuli as well.

It makes us feel better to have “correct” posture. (recommendation: spend 20 min with this TEDtalk)

Continue reading

Hey, Where is that Pain From?

Have you ever asked someone where they are from?  Sure, you have.  Have you noticed a breadth of answers in terms of history time-line?

For example: Some might say

  • “Oh, I’m from Hillcrest Neighborhood” (immediate History)
  • “I’m from Virginia” (current History)
  • “I grew up in Boston” (Childhood / Distant History)
  • “My family-line is from Poland” (Distant History)
  • etc… and on.

How far back do we normally go?  Perhaps it depends on who is asking the question, and what the context of the conversation is about.   Continue reading